Jump to content

All Activity

This stream auto-updates     

  1. Earlier
  2. We've switched forum software and we've added some great functionality, including databases, that will allow us to add some great content to this site. We're working on a database of genealogy books, a name index for those books, and a genealogy resource link directory. As always, if you have any suggestions of things you'd like to see us add to the site, feel free to contact us.
  3. The definitive work on Virginians in the Revolution, this compilation of over 65,000 names supersedes even the great researches of Eckenrode and McAllister. All data that could be found in the files of the War and Navy Departments, the State Archives and Land Office, the County Court order books of the period, early and accredited histories, and scores of miscellaneous sources are included. The men are listed alphabetically by surname, with references to the documents in which evidence of service is found. In the case of officers, for example, the material is remarkably complete. It has been possible to establish the dates of their commissions, when they took their oaths of allegiance, their promotions, citations for gallantry, deaths, and amounts of bounty land awarded them. Even with privates, for whom data is notoriously limited, Gwathmey was able to find men who were receiving pensions long after the war and, thus, establish their post-war residences. For persons interested in tracing the descendants of Virginia soldiers, and who wish to understand the magnitude of Virginia's contribution to the American cause, this volume is invaluable.
  4. This is a basic list of the colonial soldiers of Virginia known to have been engaged in active service, including names of those who participated in the French and Indian War, the Indian Wars, Lord Dunmore's War, and various engagements and campaigns prior to the Revolution. The list was drawn from company rolls, bounty applications, the Washington Papers in the Library of Congress, Hening's Statutes at Large, and Journals of the House of Burgesses, and it is believed to represent a large proportion of the entire Virginia militia, particularly after the year 1754, when muster rolls were more carefully kept. It is believed that few members of the Virginia regiment under George Washington are unaccounted for. In all some 6,700 soldiers are identified in this work, each with references to the exact source of information.
  1. Load more activity
×